Word of the week: Deckle.

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deckle

Deckle is also a word for the actual ridges or edges on the sides of the paper, according to a paper and plastics Twitter account.

Word of the week: mammothrept.

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I decided to bring back my Word of the Week series. Here’s an obsolete one that’s especially appropriate for Christmas, because according to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, it literally means “spoiled child.” That’s the kid that will get a bag of coal from Santa!

Origin and Etymology of mammothrept:
Greek mammothreptos child brought up by his grandmother, from mammē mother, grandmother + -o- + threptos, verbal of trephein to bring up, nourish

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mammothrept

Try using that one in a sentence!

Shimmer.

shimmer

Someone on another site I’ve recently become active on commented about the word “limerence,” explaining that it’s a better word than “infatuation” (which means the same thing) because “limerence” shimmers while “infatuation” sounds more like a disease involving the fat cells.

I agree wholeheartedly, and started thinking about the word shimmer. I think it’s probably one of the most beautiful words in the English language, or maybe any language. It evokes something ethereal, intangible, and almost dreamlike, but also of a delicate and fleeting nature, giving way to wistful nostalgia. In simpler terms, shimmer…shimmers. It sparkles and fades.

shimmer

*****

One of my favorite songs of is Fuel’s post-grunge hit Shimmer. This song may never make anyone’s “Best Music of the Late Twentieth Century” list, but it’s always haunted me and been one of my favorites, and I think the title has something to do with that.

Word of the week: Doryphore

Doryphores seem to be everywhere.  I hope I’m not one!

doryphore

From Psycho-Linguistics to the Politics of Psychopathy. Part 1: Propaganda.

We are living in an Orwellian society. Here’s a long but important article about the way language has been used to promote psychopathy in society and politics, and target the most vulnerable members of society. It’s a form of societal scapegoating, not much different than the way dysfunctional families target their most sensitive member (the “truthteller”) for abuse and ostracization.

Although this post is told from the perspective of modern British society, it definitely applies to America too (probably even more so), and most of the western world. Psychopathy–and its attendant lack of empathy and ruthlessness–is glorified, even though it’s not called by that name. The real victims of this compassionless agenda–the poor, disabled, minority races, immigrants, and people who otherwise don’t fit the stereotypical “ideal”–are blamed for all the ills of society even though they have never had any power. Think about how similar this is to what goes on in dysfunctional families headed by narcissists. It’s society-wide gaslighting and blame-shifting.

Language is a powerful weapon, and is being successfully used to promote this evil agenda of selfishness and callous disregard. It’s the real world Newspeak.

Politics and Insights

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1. Propaganda Techniques

Metacognition: We need to be mindful of how we think as well as what we think.

While the term propaganda has acquired a strongly negative connotation by association with its most manipulative and jingoistic examples (e.g. Nazi propaganda used to justify the Holocaust), propaganda in its original sense was neutral, and could refer to uses that were generally benign or innocuous, such as public health recommendations, signs encouraging citizens to participate in a census or election, or messages encouraging people to report crimes to law agencies, amongst others.

So the exact definition of propaganda is constantly debated, and no specific definition is completely agreed. Some argue that any persuasive communication is propaganda, whilst others hold that propaganda specifically alters political opinions. However, it is doubtless that propaganda is material which is meant to manipulate or change public opinion, and though it may vary in form and technique, it always…

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