The iridescence of flight.

I came across these two stunning photographs of a Black Jacobin Hummingbird today (the photos were taken by photographer Christian Spencer).

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The iridescence is caused by sunlight shining through the wings, forming rainbow colored prisms.

The effect is simply magical.

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Birds and scenery at Anclote Key, FL

I had a wonderful time with my son in Florida. It’s amazing what a week away can do for your soul. I stayed away from the news, and therefore had no idea what was going on in Trumpland, and didn’t really care either (I was able to put my concern on hold while I was away).

I will post a selection of photos I took later, but my son, who is a professional videographer now, took these amazing photos of some sea birds when we went out to Anclote Key (a national park consisting of a group of small uninhabited islands and sandbars about 4 miles into the Gulf of Mexico from Tarpon Springs). This is a wonderfully remote place, accessible only by boat.   The many tidal pools are a shellers’ paradise.   There are two ferries that go there  several times a day.

I had a great time, and got to spend more time with my son this time than last year, since he took a few days off work, but it’s still good to be back.  (Well, sort of).

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Wood thrush singing.

I have a wood thrush who sings from the high treetops by my house. I know because his song sounds exactly like the one in this video. I love this bird’s song, and the haunting, almost metallic way it sounds. Wood thrushes live all along the East Coast of the United States, and are shy birds. They are most common deep in the forest, but since I live on the edge of one, I can still hear him from my house.

In the early morning, and again at dusk, all the birds, including this one, go nuts with their singing.  It’s like listening to a symphony.  It drives my cats insane.   They jump at the windows trying to figure out where all the singing is coming from.