Guest Post #5: Why Does Mental Illness Stigma Exist?

in_the_asylum
In The Asylum, Unknown artist.

Matthew Malin, owner and creator of the blog  Confessions, has written a wonderful guest post describing the history of mental illness stigma, going all the way back to Roman times.    Not only is the subject matter fascinating, but the unique historical perspective shows how the stigma is rooted in two things that seem almost diametrically opposed: mental illness as a medical problem centered in the body; and ancient superstitions, such as demonic possession.   Even today, there are those who regard mental illness as either a primarily medical problem (leading to doctors over-relying on drug therapy) or a spiritual problem. While there may be both medical and spiritual elements involved in mental illness,  both views have led to stigmatization.

If you have a chance, please visit the Confessions blog.   Matthew’s articles are all about living with depression and anxiety, all written from an intimate, Christian perspective:

In the Spring of 2015 an incredible passion for those suffering from Mental Illness was born within the heart of Matty Malin. Through his own struggles with Depression and anxiety, a fire was ignited within his heart. That desire was to create a place of honesty, transparency, and love. We, the broken, have grown far too weary of the masquerade playing out before our eyes in society. We’re tired of hiding behind “I’m fine”. Here you will find unabashed clarity into the soul of man. You will also discover the love of God despite the ugly, sometimes violent, heart of man.

We fully believe that man is sinful and in need of a Savior. Jesus, the perfect son of God, stepped into our world, lived a sinless life, and was murdered voluntarily on the cross for our sins. He took on the wrath of God for us so that we might have access to a relationship with God that will one day result in spending eternity with him. We obtain salvation through faith in His work and by the grace of His loving hand.

We firmly believe that no man can go too far for the love and hope of Christ. Mental Illness can provide some of the darkest days of life. It is here that we need hope and it is here that we can find it in Christ.

WHY DOES MENTAL ILLNESS STIGMA EXIST?
By Matthew Malin

As someone who has dealt with the debilitating effects of Depression and anxiety for a period of 4, almost 5 years, I believe that I’ve stumbled across something much more paralyzing: Mental Health Stigma. The more aware I become of my own struggles and the more honest I am with myself and others, the more I find a growing discomfort with the topic of Mental Health. Why is this? What is it about Mental Health that sends general fear and inquietude through someone who is tasked with aiding the mentally ill?

A timeline of mental illness stigma.

cutting_the_stone
Cutting the Stone by Heironymous Bosch, ca. 1494

I believe that history is ultimately to blame in this arena as well as a shallow thought process towards the issue. The Greek Era (500-100 BC) brought forth our first record of Mental Health treatment. Hippocrates was of the mind that a build up of bodily fluids was to blame. In his words, he said, “It is some kind of black bile that is making you depressed.” Their treatments revolved around the physical removal of whatever fluid was ailing the individual.

The Roman people (100BC-600 AD) did nothing to treat the issue at its core either. Instead, they were of the mind that depression/mental health issues were caused by organic malfunctions. Diet and exercise were prescribed to deal with the issue. Yet another example of a culture misunderstanding the true nature of Mental Health.

During the Middle Ages (600-1100 AD), a holy war was being waged on Satan and any form of mental issue was prescribed to be due to demonic activity. The medication for such issues became obvious: Exorcism or any other kind of holy activity. It is believed that the stigma of such illnesses became obviously prevalent and prejudiced during this time.

This recap ultimately brings us to our day and age. If you take a good hard look at the process of treating/dealing with Mental Illness today, you will see a common thread amongst diagnosis and treatment. The 1950’s brought about the thought that medical treatment was the only way to deal with the issue. This solution can be easily traced back to the Greek Era and their thought processes. Others will still claim that diet and exercise will best help those suffering from mental illnesses. There are those as well who righteously claim that mental illness is of the devil and must be rid of by God.

The meaning of mental illness.

All of these prescriptions are lazy, surface level suggestions that completely forsake the underlying notion of what it means to be mentally ill.

It is within the opinion of the author that, when it is appropriate, medicinal, organic, and religious means be used to treat mental illnesses. It is not, however, appropriate to cast off those with mental illnesses by simply telling one to deal with their issues by such means.

What is meant is this: Non-suffering individuals should not settle for surface level treatments when the real issue must be dealt with by more personal means. There is more to those who are mentally ill than meets the eye.

Medicine, religion, and organic based treatments are incredibly valuable but there is one treatment that is oft ignored: the support of a caring soul.

Our culture is neck deep in instant gratification. Social media, advancements in technology, and a general lack of education have only worsened the stigma that already existed towards those with mental illness. It is within the opinion of the author that our society has lost all care and respect for the people around them. Why? We’re far too caught up in ourselves.

What needs to be done.

It is a sad, unfortunate truth that this stigma will truly never go away. Some people will never care but all hope has not been lost. While arrogance can hardly be cured, ignorance can be educated. This kind of teaching cannot take place within a classroom. This is the kind of schooling that happens through our parenting, our social lives, and our social media ones. What I’m advocating for is change, but not from the outside world.

Change has to come from within if we ever want to make a difference. This requires those with any kind of mental illness to step up and speak out. It requires a willingness to open up about the issues, the difficulties, and the failures that come along with mental health. This change begins with us.

I recognize what I’m asking. I’ve not been very shy about my struggles but I recognize that it may come a little harder for others. Whether social stigma has silenced your voice or your own perceived stigma has, it can be an incredibly difficult thing to open up about. Let me reassure you of this: Your mental illness does not define who you are. Yes, it limits you. Yes, it makes life a little more difficult. I guarantee you though that it does not take away your worth as a human being.

You have been fearfully and wonderfully made by the God of the Universe and He loves you. You were made in His image! No person can ever take that away from you. No amount of vicious vocabulary or audacious action can strip you of your worth as a human being. Don’t allow yourself to tell you that you have no worth and therefore cannot speak out. Don’t allow other people to tell you that either. You have inherent worth, you are loved, and you are capable of standing against this.

Decide today that you will no longer stay quiet in this battle. You have a voice, let it be heard.

Be the change you wish to see in this world.

God bless you,

Matthew Malin
Author and Founder of Confessions:

https://confessions92.wordpress.com/

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About luckyotter

This blog is my journal. I just choose to share it with the world instead of keeping everything inside my head. I'm a recovering Borderline and have also struggled with Avoidant Personality Disorder. I also have Complex PTSD due to having been the victim of narcissistic abuse for most of my life. I write mostly about narcissism, because I was the child of a narcissistic mother, and then married to a sociopathic malignant narcissist for 20 years. But there's a silver lining too. In some ways they taught me about myself. This blog is about all that. Not all my articles will be about NPD, BPD or other personality disorders or mental conditions. I pretty much write about whatever's on my mind at the moment. So there's something for everyone here. Blogging about stuff is crack for my soul. It's self therapy, and hopefully my insights and observations may help others too.
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19 Responses to Guest Post #5: Why Does Mental Illness Stigma Exist?

  1. Reblogged this on Confessions and commented:
    To all of my readers,

    This is an article I was given the chance to write for Lucky Otter! She was gracious enough to allow me to write this and publish it on her blog. Go check it out and if you’re not already following her do that too!

    Much love,

    Matt

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Leslie says:

    Love this article! There are some suffering from mental health disorders who cannot stand up for themselves which I think makes it all the more important that those of us who can, do.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Just Plain Ol' Vic says:

    Great guest post!

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Beautifully said!

    I was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1967 when I was fourteen years old. My entire family immediately shunned me. Two years later, a new psychiatrist decided that I had been badly misdiagnosed. He told me that he had spoken at length with both of my parents and both sets of my grandparents, telling them that I was a mentally normal, but severely traumatized, teenager. (This doctor was before his time — PTSD did not become an official psychiatric diagnosis until 1980.)

    However, it did not matter to my family what my new doctor said. In their eyes, if you have ever been diagnosed crazy, you are always going to be crazy, and an embarrassment to the family. Today, less than two months away from turning sixty-three, the majority in my family of origin still shun me.

    I am so sorry that the author of this post has lived through such devastating pain. I am also deeply grateful, and encouraged, to know that I am not alone!

    Liked by 2 people

    • luckyotter says:

      Your story is so inspirational, Linda , but I’m sorry you had to experience such a horrible thing and have the people who are supposed to love you unconditionally shun you and throw you away. You’re doing great!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Aww, thank you! I am working on my guest post in my head, I only have a small part of it written down so far. My post is going to focus on my maternal grandfather, who was the associate warden of Leavenworth Federal Penitentiary and who lived with my grandmother in the huge Warden’s Mansion during the two years that I was incarcerated at the state insane asylum a few miles away in Nevada, Missouri.

        Prior to my mental breakdown in my early teens, my grandfather had genuinely seemed to love me very much… until I became an embarrassment to his high standing in the community….

        Like

    • Linda,

      My heart breaks hearing your story. I have never had to experience such pain on that kind of a level. I’m glad that this could you encourage you but I am so sorry to hear of the pain that you have gone through. It truly is sad that those who are closest to you tend to be the ones who hurt you the quickest. 😦

      Liked by 2 people

    • Susan says:

      its more about them than you.. your family.. under their own delusion about your true pain. denial from loved ones makes us crazy!! its a form of neglect. you cant be responsible to do both sides..both love them and love yourself from them.. many expect us to carry them.. where they failed. and love ourselves without them and its a double cruelty.. we are waiting for THEM to heal…….my heart has experienced extreme OUTpourings of love.,.it was me and my ability to love… others and then what felt like a cork shoved in it.. like a faucet of love with a cork violently stopping it up…. I cannot figure it out. how is it someone’s business if I am capable of love and they are not? why then try to stop it? we will all know someday. its a crossed wire/miscommunication.. that requires healing…

      Liked by 2 people

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